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 Weiße Stadt / White City 

photo series on a post-pandemic world | 2022

Walking through the White City I had a strange and surreal feeling, as if I had entered a sterile fortress, with straight lines and perfect lawns.

During the Weimar Republic, six different housing estates were built in Berlin as a result of the housing crisis and the poor economic situation. 

Between 1929 and  1931, three architects, Wilhelm Büning, Bruno Ahrends and Otto Rudolf Salvisberg, were commissioned  to build more than 1,200 new apartments.  As a cost saving construction measure,  they incorporated a uniformly coated white plaster, which gave it its unmistakable appearance as well as the nickname “Weiße Stadt”, or White City.

Considered one of the six world-famous Berlin Modernist housing estates, the White City has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2008. 

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Built under the motto Together you are less alone, the community aspect was a key factor.

Of course, during the pandemic, the collective use of the space was non-existent.

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Walking through the White City I had a strange and surreal feeling, as if I had entered a sterile fortress, with straight lines and perfect lawns.

This space made me feel uncomfortable and I didn’t know why.

 

I later realized it was due to a lack of people.

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In this almost abstract place, time stands still:

a post-pandemic world, in which we vaguely start to recognise signs of human presence.

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Subtle details start to emerge in the perfect white landscapes. 

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People are still very insecure and cautious, they are slowly trying to adjust to the new normality, to the togetherness they all seemed to have forgotten.  

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The White City series was developed as part of the StrudelmediaLive & Heather B. Mattera Scholarship during the Documentary Storytelling class with Anita Pouchard Serra.